Inadvertent truth

This is NOT a photoshop! ๐Ÿ™‚

2015_03 15 BHO not a photoshop

17 Comments

Filed under Barack Obama

17 responses to “Inadvertent truth

  1. First Wife with her head in front of a big shrub. Hillary with horns on Time mag cover. Obama with halos.

    A photographer might seek a certain set-up in a photo, or might get a lucky shot. He might know what he got at the time, or might not see it until he sees the print later. A shot might pass through several hands without some peculiarity being noticed, even though photogs and editors are always on the look-out for such things.

    But what are the odds that this shot was released with no one along the way noticing?!?

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    • chrissythehyphenated

      Dearest and I pondered this as well. Given how Oblami operates, I’d guess his WH photographer is fed to the teeth with him and gleefully sent this one out, while going, “Oops! I didn’t know until I saw it on Twitter!”

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  2. Kinda like the old Soviet agitpropists used to get some art past the censors that made the leaders look stupid, but only if you looked at it just ‘right.’

    I think a lot of modern-day artists do this just for fun, and people rarely even notice. At Lockheed Martin we had a Titan-IV rocket poster that was commissioned to show a glorious rocket launch from above and to the side. The artist obviously set it up to look like a huge phallus with two flame plumes at the base and other details that made the intention particularly clear. I still have the poster on my garage wall, even though I think it’s a little crude. Mainly I think it’s troublesome that some manager, somewhere, approved it without thinking about it very much.

    I think 89% of the artwork displayed at Denver Int’l Airport is the same way. Public funds going to some idiot, child artist who thinks it’s cool to mock their customers. In the case of public art, it’s us who get mocked.

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  3. Here’s some PI humor (a couple days late) for Ting (who was a math major in college).

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  4. One of the reasons I couldn’t keep track of PN last week was that I got this at the CandleWood Suites Network:

    And there was no way to get around it. I’m getting pretty tired of seeing conservative websites blocked by public networks.

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    • PoliNation blocked? Probably not political. It has to be some of those pix Pete posts, you know, the eye-bleach ones. I could understand being blocked for those…

      Or maybe it’s because of those awful commenters you allow. Like that “webslacker” guy. o_O

      Seriously, congratulations, PoliNationals! If PN is on a political $#!+ list, it’s a badge of honor. Means the place has been effective and noticed. I mean, somebody had to first assess and object to the content, right? As the flyboys say, if you’re taking flak, you’re over the target.

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      • Hah! Funny about that “webslacker” guy. ๐Ÿ™‚ But I honestly think part of the reason was political. Their claim was that they didn’t have “enough data” on the websites they blocked. That’s crazy. You’re seriously going to block every website you haven’t thoroughly researched? They did block many small-time sites, including the GruntOfMonteCristo blog and the BluebirdOfBitterness – all conservative. Meanwhile, they didn’t tend to block smutty Tumblr sites or even many other right-leaning sites displaying far more patriotic and “poor-taste” material than we ever do. I suspect they block all lesser known WordPress sites by default because they’re known to lean conservative and anti-administration in general, but it’s hard to know for sure.

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        • Yes, I was trying to be funny, but I presume with these Nanny services, somebody chooses the parameters, and those parameters are more about politikal korrectness than about what you’n’I might consider objectionable. Maybe you’re right about the “lesser WordPress sites” algorithm, but I would think the site was more likely specifically on a hit list.

          Such lists may have to let some of the Bigger sites in by demand, but can widely block others. Wouldn’t want to block any pre-teen access to sexual indulgence information; don’t want to discourage their youthful exploration. But we will shield them from infection with sites pushing Constitutionalism or Morality.

          Thanks for checking out the Tumblr smut access, in the interests of science, by the way. ๐Ÿ˜€

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          • Heheh! Right! BTW, speaking of conservative sites that get no respect (Kidding! That would be all of us!), I have been over to the WebWorks site many times, and tried to comment several times, but it’s never worked out. I must not be on the right services to get all the way through the process, but I wanted you to know I love the site! Some really great work you’ve done over there. Puts some of us to shame!

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            • Thanks, but, um [puts on techie webmaster wizard’s hat], If you have problems commenting, I’d like some detail, ’cause there’s no Disqus-like or other comment service, just me & my content mgmt system (cms). You could email me at webworker at my website.

              Presuming you weren’t being spam-blocked… First thought is, y’gotta have javascript on, but I ‘spect you know that. There is a second layer, which is you have to click on the word “comments” to open up the comments area. Did you get that far?

              My site dates back to the ancient pre-Interactive days of the interewebs, when content just sat there to be consumed and commenting was for email. It’s a one-man show running this new cms thingy in recent years, too. Therefore, I only opened up for comments relatively recently, and with much trepidation for both how to handle them and what might be commented, but mostly it’s been empty-room echoey (blessing counted).

              I’m never sure if I’ve set all the levers & gears in the right way, but this is the first I’ve heard of a problem. The spammers can leave messages (the ones that slip past my spam-filter service). And bob and Ting and a very few others got through. If they can do it… ๐Ÿ˜€

              (Heh – This may be the incentive for this webslacker to actually look at the site again. For the 19th anniversary tomorrow.)

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              • Ting

                Wow! 19 years is a long time ago. My kids were begging me for AOL dial up back then, but I resisted for many years after that! Congratulations, Mindful!

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                • chrissythehyphenated

                  Ditto here. We finally got internet briefly so dh could download an architecture CAD thing he needed. He signed up for one month and only told me how to get on, not the kids. I tried it out and he was so amazed (read: relieved) at the positive change in my mood that he decided we needed internet access for homebound mommy’s mental health.

                  I didn’t get into blogging until HB, but I was visiting chat rooms and doing email long enough ago that … hmmm … one of the first friends I made in a chat room had a 5 year old who is now in college. So not 19 years. More like 13 or 14. I still remember fondly the “squeeeeeeeeeeeee squawkkkkk” and “You’ve got mail!” It was my ticket out of my lonely, air-filtered bubble and into a world of living people (besides my husband and girls) who cared about me.

                  The #1 reason we resisted internet access was fear over contaminating hubby’s business puter. My sister pooh-poohed this, “We have internet and our business is on the computer.” Uh, no, sister dearest. Your BOOKS are on the computer; your BUSINESS is a service station, which is in a building full of tools you own. Dearest’s BUSINESS is architecture on CAD; it is ALL on the computer.

                  The funny thing is that, while we have gotten a virus and had our financial information hacked, neither was due to the internet. The virus came in on an infected disk we physically loaded here and the sheriff traced out credit card account number theft to a clerk at a local store.

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              • Ting’s right. Nineteen years on the web is beyond anybody I know. Well done, Mindful! ๐Ÿ™‚

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                • cth: “…We finally got internet briefly…”

                  I keep coming back to that line. I think it’s hilarious. As the saying goes, I do not understand those words in that order! Briefly?? How could you not have the ubiquitous Intrawebz?? howl the young’n’s. It’s as if you said, yeah, we tried that new-fangled electricity stuff for a few days….

                  I had been on CompuServe. They (finally) opened up an email portal to the net. Through that email portal, a correspondent friend kept encouraging me to “get on the web.” (Thanks, Matt!) I did not get it, though, until CompuServe opened its own web adjunct, SpryNet.com. That’s when I finally left the sheltered confines of CS and launched out into the ungoverned seas of teh innertubes.

                  The URL for the first Mindful home page was something like home.sprynet.com/~mindful.

                  CompuServe, always just a side business of H&R Block, was becoming buggy whips in the motorcar age, so as they burned out, they sold SpryNet to MindSpring.

                  MindSpring had a big ceremony about how the companies were “merging,” when they got gobbled up by Earthlink. Then Mindspring vanished for good.

                  Throughout, I kept my original URL (and mindful@sprynet.com email).

                  IIRC, it was with Earthlink that slow-learner I finally registered the mindfulwebworks.com domain. Eventually, I changed hosts, dropped Earthlink, and lost the original SpryNet website. By then, it was nothing but pages redirecting to the domain, but, lost those historic weblinks. Somewhere, out there in webland, on some ancient webpage, someone clicks a link to my SpryNet site, and gets a 404. *sads*

                  Earliest graphics and webpages, I worked hard to make sure they were 16-color, low-bandwidth friendly, and CGA viewable. Later, I figured 256-color and VGA were common. Nowadays, anyone with a blog can embed hi-res videos and most folks can run them on their HD cells and laptops. Hi-res immersion interactive game-playing is a common thing! I’ve built:
                  http://mindfulwebworks.com/second-life/chick-n-egg-for-second-life
                  self-reproducing virtual chickens in Second Life! (Answer: Chicken came first.) A long way from my first web pages!

                  What will it all be like in another 20 years, Gods willing and Ragnarok don’ rise?

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                • Argh. Perhaps someone could close that link tag for me?

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                • No worries! Sorry I couldn’t fix it directly, but I’m not the html master. At least the link works.

                  Hey MW, I appreciate the tips about commenting over at the Works. I’m still working on that!

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                • chrissythehyphenated

                  I believe that in 20 years, we’ll be living in New Earth and all evil will be locked up forever in the burning lake. We’ll be able to teleport to visit peeps IRL and occasionally we’ll laugh about how great we thought it was back in the old days that we could type crude messages to our friends. ๐Ÿ™‚

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