Category Archives: History

The most amazing lie in history: how a chicken farmer, a pair of princesses, and 27 imaginary spies helped the Allies win World War II

The Allies’ top-secret weapon.

Only one man in history was both awarded the Iron Cross for his service to Nazi Germany AND also made a member of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire by King George VI. That man was Juan Pujol Garcia, a draft-dodging chicken farmer and failed businessman from Barcelona who decided during World War II to become a double agent in order to help the Allies defeat Hitler. Here is his amazing story, as recounted by Lucas Reilly in Mental Floss:

In the weeks leading up to D-day, Allied commanders had their best game faces on. “This operation is not being planned with any alternatives,” barked General Dwight D. Eisenhower. “This operation is planned as a victory, and that’s the way it’s going to be!” Indeed, more than 6,000 ships were ready to cruise across the English Channel to plant the first wave of two million troops on the white beaches of Normandy. Nearly 20,000 vehicles would crawl ashore as 13,000 planes dropped thousands of tons of explosives and thousands of paratroopers.

The sheer size of the invasion—it would be the largest in history—was staggering. But so were the stakes. With the first day’s casualty rate expected to reach 90 percent and the outcome of World War II hanging in the balance, the truth was that Eisenhower was riddled with doubt. He’d transformed into an anxious chimney, puffing four packs of cigarettes a day. Other Allied leaders felt equally unsure. “I see the tides running red with their blood,” Winston Churchill lamented. General George S. Patton privately complained of feeling “awfully restless.” Chief of the Imperial General Staff Alan Brooke was more blunt: “It won’t work,” he said. The day before the invasion, Eisenhower quietly penciled a note accepting blame in case he had to order retreat. When he watched the last of the 101st Airborne Division take off, the steely general started to cry.

They were worried for good reason. With so many troops and so much artillery swelling in England, it was impossible to keep the attack a secret. Hitler knew it was coming, and he’d been preparing a defense for months. Only one detail eluded him, and he was confident in a Nazi victory if he could figure it out—he needed to know where, exactly, the attack would happen. To make D-day a success, the Allies needed to keep him in the dark: They’d have to trick the Germans into thinking the real invasion was just a bluff, while making it seem like a major attack was imminent elsewhere. The task seemed impossible, but luckily, the British had a secret weapon: a short, young balding Spaniard. He was the king of con men, an amateur spy gone pro, the world’s sneakiest liar. He was also, of all things, a chicken farmer.

[story continues here]

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Will They Be Forgotten?

Will D-Day fade into history when the last World War II veteran is gone?

Today is the 73rd anniversary of that June 6, 1944, invasion of France that saw one of the largest forces ever assembled for battle on land, sea and air.

Some 156,000 American, British and Canadian troops attacked German defenders along a 50-mile stretch of heavily defended Normandy coastline.

An estimated 4,000 Allied troops were killed, but by the end of the day the beachheads had been secured in an invasion that was called the beginning of the end of the war in Europe.

The number of living veterans who served in World War II is dwindling; down from 16 million during the war to about 500,000 today (Ohio has more than 26,000). They’re dying at a rate of 372 a day, with an average age now in the 90s.


http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2017/06/will_d-day_fade_into_history_w.html

Given that our so-called “educators” are largely anti-war, anti-capitalist propagandists revisionist history is a large part of their lesson plan. The removal of most statues of Confederate Civil War figures, which have been labeled as ‘racist’ in the South, is a prime example of destroying our history from the inside out.
The men who stormed the Normandy beaches were mostly 18 and 19 year old men. They faced almost certain death without flinching because their sense of duty demanded it. Fast forward to today, where these pampered snowflakes demand “safe spaces” and whine incessantly about anything that upsets them.
How about the Tommies, who fought alongside the Americans, Canadians, and Australians? The land they sacrificed for has been overrun by terrorists who were welcomed in to live off the government, sequester themselves and foment the savagery and barbarism their religion preaches.
We’ve raised a generation of whiners and people who think they deserve special treatment because they’ve been labeled ‘oppressed minorities’ and given special consideration.
One thing I can be grateful for is that I needn’t be a witness to this insanity much longer.

D-Day: June 6th 1944 as it happened

Timeline of the D-Day landings of 6th June 1944 hour by hour as events unfolded on the day

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/history/world-war-two/10878674/D-Day-6th-June-1944-as-it-happened-live.html

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The Most Daring Papal Encyclical Ever Delivered

In 1937, the papal encyclical Mit brennender Sorge (With burning anxiety) was smuggled into Germany and read from every Catholic pulpit on Palm Sunday.  The letter expressed solidarity with faithful Catholics in Germany and spelled out the inherent contradiction between Nazism and Christianity. 

Mit brennender Sorge

Pope Pius XI knew the Gestapo would never allow the document to be distributed, so it was smuggled into Germany and distributed to Catholic printers.  On March 11, 1937, under cover of night, hundreds of thousands of copies were smuggled to every German Catholic Church where, the next morning, priests read it, in its entirety, from the pulpits.

The Nazis never saw it comingBy the time Palm Sunday Mass was over, Gestapo guards were at the church doors to confiscate copies.  But they were too late to prevent some twenty million German Catholics from hearing their pontiff condemn Hitler and his regime.

SUGGESTED READING

The Myth of Hitler’s Pope: Pope Pius XII and His Secret War Against Nazi Germany by Rabbi David G. Dalin
Hitler, the War, and the Pope by Ronald Rychlak
Bearing False Witness: Debunking Centuries of Anti-Catholic History by Rodney Stark
Church of Spies: The Pope’s Secret War Against Hitler by Mark Riebling
The Priest Barracks: Dachau 1938 – 1945 by Guillaume Zeller

Source:

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Happy V-E Day

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Study History

Sowell Study History

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Gaining Insight Into Today’s Political and Cultural Scene

I’ve been reading How the Catholic Church Built Western Civilization.  It’s a fascinating book that makes a very compelling argument for why Catholic-Christianity is responsible for the moral, ethical, and legal basis for Western civilization.

When the author compares some element of Western civilization with the way the pagan world operated in Christ’s time, I am often struck by how similar the pagan world was to the way the Left wants our world to become.

I recommend this book, even if you’re no fan of Catholicism.  All of Christianity was Catholic until 1517, by which time Western civilization was well established.

Even where they reject certain Catholic doctrines, most Protestants take Catholic values for granted.  This is very evident in the Constitution, which was written by Protestants and which the Left wants to radically alter.

This book can give you a good insight into the political and cultural battles we face today and make it even more clear that it’s not so much a political and cultural battle as it is a spiritual one.

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Happy birthday to a great American

Booker T. Washington was born on April 5, 1856, the illegitimate son of a black slave and a white plantation owner. Following emancipation, he worked his way through school, eventually becoming a teacher. In 1881, at the age of 25, he helped to found the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, a college for training black teachers.

Washington devoted his life to improving the lives of black Americans through education and vocational training, with a strong emphasis on teaching the life skills they would need to gain social acceptance, overcome white racism, and lead productive lives. He was often criticized by other black civil rights leaders of his time who found his style too understated and insufficiently confrontational. Washington’s formula for success for black Americans — education, thrift, and hard work — is what many black kids nowadays dismiss as “acting white.”

Booker T. Washington said:

“Success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which he has overcome.”

And:

“No greater injury can be done to any youth than to let him feel that because he belongs to this or that race he will be advanced in life regardless of his own merits or efforts.”

And:

“There’s a class of colored people who make a business of keeping the troubles, the wrongs and the hardships of the Negro race before the public. … Some of these people do not want the Negro to lose his grievances because they do not want to lose their jobs. There is a certain class of race-problem solvers who don’t want the patient to get well because as long as the disease holds out, they have not only an easy means of making a living, but also an easy medium through which to make themselves prominent before the public.”

Washington wrote fourteen books, including an autobiography, Up From Slavery, which was published in 1901. He was instrumental in raising the funds for and helping to establish thousands of educational institutions for blacks throughout the south. He remained head of the Tuskegee Institute until his death in 1915, at which time Tuskegee’s endowment had grown to more than $1.5 million, due largely to his efforts.

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The Not-So-Sinister Inquisition

If you are a Trump voter who is sick of being portrayed as evil by the lying left, then you know exactly how I feel about the lies that are commonly believed about the Catholic Inquisition.

Excerpt from “Seven Lies About Catholic History” by Diane Moczar (pp. 95-96, altered slightly for clarity only) [TAN, 2012]:

Spanish King and Holy Roman Emperor Charles V came to his thrones as a young man just as Luther was getting going nicely.  He was understandably anxious that the appalling disorder and loss of life caused by Protestants in the German lands not spread to his realm of Spain.  

Thus he had the Office of the Spanish Inquisition keeping a lookout for Protestant missionaries trying to infiltrate Spain from the north.  The very presence of this court seems to have had the desired effect: in the whole of the sixteenth century, the century of the Reformation, the Spanish Inquisition executed 182 heretics, or less than two per year.

By comparison the Protestant persecutions of Catholics in England, Ireland, the Netherlands, and elsewhere in northern Europe, together with the wars fought between Catholics and Protestants on the European continent, took tens of thousands of lives.

BBC: De-mythologizing the Spanish Inquisition

This video is long, but it is VERY much worth watching!  What most people think they know about the Spanish Inquisition is based on anti-Catholic slander published by Protestants in the 16th c.  This so-called “Black Legend” has been repeated ever since. The Spanish Inquisition kept meticulous records which have now, finally, been opened up and really studied by serious historians.  The story they tell is very different from the “Black Legend.”

The last five minutes is particularly compelling. A fellow I believe is a Spanish historian explains why the myths about the Inquisition became so popular and pervasive. His insights speak loudly to our own political myths. One point he makes is that a myth is simple; it is easier to believe a simple lie than to wrap our minds around the complexities of reality. The other point is that we don’t like to face the ugliness within our own natures; it is more comfortable to project that ugliness on to some “other” who is sufficiently distant to be safely demonized.

Read more.

http://fisheaters.com/spanishinquisition.html

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