Good Reads

I am now on my third reading of a fascinating book, “The Genesis of Science”, by James Hannam.

Hannam shows how the emergence of what we call “science” did not spring from the foreheads of a few Renaissance geniuses who managed to somehow overcome to oppressive Catholicism of the Middle Ages.

Rather, those geniuses built on the steady progression of developments by brilliant thinkers during the Middle Ages who had been educated at Catholic monasteries and universities.

One point I found particularly interesting was that people in the Middle Ages knew the Earth was round. The ancient Greeks knew this also.

Hannam also shows how not stupid it was for people to go on believing the Earth was the center of the universe until after the development of good telescopes and some really complicated math.

There is a good section about the Galileo affair in Hannam’s book, as well as in another book I highly recommend.  “What’s So Great About Christianity?” by Dinesh D’Souza. I’ve read that one three times also. 🙂

  • Hannam is more concerned with showing the roots of modern science in the Middle Ages.
  • D’Souza is more concerned with demonstrating how we would absolutely NOT have modern science if it were not for the theological and financial support of the Roman Catholic Church.

Both books are fascinating reads and good tonics for the propaganda that routinely passes for history in our culture.

Advertisements

4 Comments

Filed under Books, Christianity, Science

4 responses to “Good Reads

  1. cth: One point I found particularly interesting was that people in the Middle Ages knew the Earth was round. The ancient Greeks knew this also.

    Yeah, the kids’ story we used to get, that Columbus’s voyage proved the earth was round, was always a story for children and the ignorant. Yes, not only was it well known (by the informed) that the earth was round, it was even fairly well known what it’s size was.

    (Which, ironically, is why Columbus had a hard time finding a sponsor for his westward journey to India — hIs potential sponsors were warned by wiser sailors that ol’ Chris had the size of the world wrong, by about half.)

    Liked by 1 person

    • chrissythehyphenated

      LOL so true! I can’t remember where I read it, but somebody (maybe D’Souza) pointed out that it’s easy to intuit that the Earth is round simply by watching a tall masted ship sail away. If the Earth was flat, it would appear to become tinier and tinier as it got farther away. But what actually happens is that it “sinks” below the horizon hull first.

      This is very much NOT the case with the now well known fact that the Earth revolves around the Sun. That requires a lot of sophisticated observations with good telescopes to intuit and some seriously complex math to prove.

      Liked by 2 people

      • cth: …fact that the Earth revolves around the Sun… requires a lot of sophisticated observations with good telescopes to intuit and some seriously complex math to prove.

        Wellll, meet Aristarchus of Samos (ca. 310–230 BC) — “an ancient Greek astronomer and mathematician who presented the first known model that placed the Sun at the center of the known universe with the Earth revolving around it. … he put the other planets in their correct order of distance around the Sun. Like Anaxagoras before him, he suspected that the stars were just other bodies like the Sun, albeit further away from Earth. He was also the first one to deduce the rotation of Earth on its axis.[citation needed] His astronomical ideas were often rejected in favor of the incorrect geocentric theories of Aristotle and Ptolemy. Nicolaus Copernicus attributed the heliocentric theory to Aristarchus.”
        Says Wikipedia
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aristarchus_of_Samos

        (Although it says in their Copernicus article that Nic arrived at his conclusions independently of Ari. Heh. Wikipedia, ‘mirite?)
        ____
        I just noticed, in my previous message I wrote, ” it was even fairly well known what it’s size was.” My inner grade-school schoolmarm is giving me ten lashes with a wet noodle for that errant apostrophe.

        Liked by 1 person

        • chrissythehyphenated

          Hannam talks a lot about how long and persistently the learned clung to Aristotle’s wrong ideas. It’s interesting given how prone the agnostic/atheistic Left is to blame all things wrong on Catholicism! LOL

          Liked by 1 person

Leave a comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s