President Barack Obama = An Arab Backed Imposter

President Impostor by Mindful Webworker [:31]

OBAMA Kept promise to Taliban

18 Comments

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18 responses to “President Barack Obama = An Arab Backed Imposter

  1. chrissythehyphenated

    Yesterday, I read all of Obama’s summer 2014 statements on ISIS in Iraq. They mostly all said the exact same thing: We’re sending in air strikes … ooh look we sent in air strikes; We’re doing humanitarian air drops … ooh look we dropped food and water; We’re not going to put America boots on the ground … relax, Leftie base! I’m not BUSHITLER; and the kicker … “We will use our immense moral authority and diplomatic esteem to push these fractious nations to play nicely together and solve their own problems politically.”

    Uhhhhhhhhhh hunh. WHAT authority and esteem would that be? The “God Bless America” that prevailed in 2003, when Bush assembled a huge coalition to fight the GWOT your Homeland head calls, “Man caused disasters” and you call, “Local problems”? The authority and esteem you and your Leftie buds here and abroad TRASHED with LIES while our boots were on the ground … including MY KIDS’ BOOTS, YOU ………………… !!!!

    One promise Obama has kept in spades is to “fundamentally transform America” into “just another nation.” And the world has bought it … at least for as long as HE is in the White House.

    http://www.westernjournalism.com/obama-kept-in-the-dark-about-anti-islamist-libya-airstrikes-by-u-s-friends-military-allies/

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  2. chrissythehyphenated

    The Dawn of Libya, an Islamist militia group, has taken over a US embassy compound in the Libyan capital of Tripoli.
    http://rt.com/news/184092-us-embassy-libya-seize/

    This totally explains why Obama’s weekly message was about … raising the minimum wage.

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  3. Heh. I just thought I’d see if there was anything new in the garden before I shut down the desktop, and got a smile-inducing surprise. Thanks, chrissy. And, thank you, Grunt. I just posted a new one of the vacuous children at the State Dept. Valley Girls. (Don’t know if YouTube will let me get away with using the Zappa music.)

    I was just checking in because, I’ve been watching all weekend for some thread appropriate to recommend a video recently posted on Cousin Brandon’s blog that I knew you’d like, in case you haven’t already seen it:
    Life in the womb (9 months in 4 minutes) HD

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  4. A.Men

    Aide and comfort to America’s enemies by Baraq Hussein obomba and his beard and leftists.

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  5. . . . I would be all “Woah, weird coincidence”. . . but I’m a devoted Harry Potter fangirl, so I know better. . .

    this is weird.

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    • chrissythehyphenated

      Judging by Scripture, names are a very big deal with God. Plus He has a wicked sense of humor and, IMHO, is totally NOT beneath making anagrams. I’m sure you’ve read C.S. Lewis’ science fiction trilogy. Remember them making a point of telling the protagonist that he had not been named “Ransom” by accident?

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      • I love those books. I read them in college for a literature course I was taking, and have reread them a couple of times since. They are wonderful.

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      • Actually, have not read them yet. They are on The List. . .Which I am working my way through . . .

        But yes, names are a real big deal with God, I have noticed that. Like with Dickens and other authors–> There is No Coincidence. ..

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        • As a fiction writer yourself, z, you know how important and significant names are. When I’m writing a story, the characters themselves often let me know what their names are. My youngest daughter got sneaky one day and looked at a manuscript I was working on, and she took issue with the name of my protagonist. I told her I didn’t have any control over it; I didn’t choose it. That’s just what the girl’s name happened to be.

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          • Very true. Some characters show up, fully named and with a ton of details already in place, often to my own irritation. Sometimes, though, oh, it takes forever to learn their names. There will be a ton of disjointed information around the character, but it may take a while to learn the name, simply because 1) it’s not one that springs readily to mind and 2) when I’m looking for it, I’m looking in the wrong place. Like the Egyptian name “Niut”. How was I supposed to know that was the name of a Space Ninja from the year 3100? *shrugs* ๐Ÿ˜€ But finally finding that name made a lot of things suddenly make sense that hadn’t been sensible before. .

            But either way, the name is always a very important. . . “tell” to a character. There’s something about the name– either meaning, or some other historic or fictional person– the name holds a key into the character’s meaning, who they are, what they are, and their role in their universe. . . And once it’s set, there is no changing it. None. I’ve tried it. I’ve had muttered conversations with characters, trying to wheedle them into being something different, only to have them flip me off and go on their merry way.

            Ninjas, man. . . So stubborn. . .

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            • I hear you. It frustrates me that characters in a story have free will, and sometimes they do things I didn’t want them to do. It can really throw a wrench in the works. I wish I could control them better, but if I try, they become cardboard cutouts instead of real, believable people.

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              • chrissythehyphenated

                I am now TOTALLY convinced that we don’t create our art ourselves. I don’t write fiction, but I have had these kinds of experiences with my art projects, where something I had zero control over has turned out to be absolutely right.

                I think I’m having a glimmer of an idea here what it means that God “inspired” the Bible writers. I can easily see some critic pointing to a puzzling passage, “Why’d you put THAT in here? It makes NO sense!” … “I had to. It needed to be there.”

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                • My brother the artist would agree with you — certain things happen just because they have to happen that way, or (even weirder) because the subject of the piece told you that that was the way it had to be done. I’ve heard similar things from other types of artists — even interior decorators, who insist that certain houses will tell them how they should be decorated, and they’ve learned not to argue with them.

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                • chrissythehyphenated

                  Yup. I remember one of my girls telling me how she heard a friend in her art class talking to her painting and exclaimed, “My mom does that!” ๐Ÿ™‚

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                • I haven’t painted or drawn much in a long while, but I had a few similar experiences– some things painted themselves. I don’t know how it happened, but there you go. They painted themselves, and my hand and brush were just along for the ride. Likewise, in college, some musical compositions wrote themselves. It was very rare, but there were a few (very short) composition assignments that were perfect the first draft.

                  When I was in Salzburg, I got to see some of Mozarts original copies– everything he composed was like that– only one draft, no mistakes, the music wrote itself. And when you listen, you can tell– perfect the first time. . .he and his pen just scribbled down what he was hearing. IIRC, St. Hildegard of Bingen said much the same about her compositions. . .

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                • I think this is where the idea that truly gifted artists are nutty comes from, lol. People think we’re talking to ourselves, but we’re just arguing with our “Muse”. . . and if we’re on the truly right track, the Muse can’t be argued with. . .

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