Ailurophobia

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13 responses to “Ailurophobia

  1. Our cats had some excitement this morning when another chipmunk managed to get into our house. (Why any rodent with a functioning brain would come inside a house with six cats in it remains a mystery, but they keep doing it.) I woke up at 5 a.m. because I heard loud chirping noises — I thought I was dreaming and tried to get back to sleep, but it was impossible. Soon my husband woke up too, and we finally realized there was a chipmunk in our bedroom. We tried to trap it, but failed. After a while the cats figured out what was going on and they had loads of fun chasing the poor terrified little creature all over the house. Figaro actually caught it several times, but you know how cats are — they always want to play with the stuff the catch, and then the critter gets away. FINALLY my husband was able to catch Figaro while he had the chippy in his mouth, and he held him over a wastebasket and shook him until he dropped the chippy in the wastebasket. Then he took it outside and released it. Figaro was NOT amused.

    Sure wish we could figure out how these critters keep getting into our house…

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    • chrissythehyphenated

      ROFLL … Shaking cat over trash can ROFLLLLLLLLLL.

      Have you considered that releasing chipmunks who know the route into your house may be a mistake?

      I used to be all “no kill” until we had a family of mice move into the walls carrying goodness knows what kinds of ticks and fleas or whatever. They made babies, ate the dog’s food, crapped all over, chewed through food packages, and were climbing around inside the walls where the wires are. We had a bunny once that would NOT leave the wires alone and nearly electrocuted himself, so I was having nightmares about damaged insulation on wires causing a house fire.

      I can’t live anywhere else and even a small fire would cause huge problems for me with the smoke, esp the toxic burned-plastic variety, and the need to open walls for repairs would mean smelly construction guys, dust, yada yada, in my delicate princess filtered air spaces. Not to mention how would we pay for it.

      Then I got thinking what a battle these mice would put up if I tried to invade and damage THEIR home. So why can’t I defend mine, I say to myself when I have arguments with my former Libtard self.

      Now, I have a no tolerance rule on unwanted critters who figure out how to get into my house. But that’s just one of those ways that the Right Wingnuts have rotted my brain. I also use paper towels! Oh my.

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      • I’m probably giving the chippy credit for more intelligence than it deserves, but of course what we HOPE is that it will realize — having been caught numerous times by a very large cat — that coming into our house is a very bad idea. Ideally, it would also inform the rest of the local chipmunk population of that fact (“Don’t go in there! They have monsters that will try to EAT you!”)… but I’m sure that’s expecting too much. Sigh.

        All small rodents reproduce prolifically to compensate for their high mortality rate, which is largely due to the fact that they have very little in the way of a brain. And yet chipmunks are smart enough that they can learn to eat from the hand of a friendly human (e.g., my teenage daughter, who tames them and makes pets of them) — in other words, unlike most wild animals, they have enough smarts to be able to distinguish between large creatures that mean them harm and large creatures that don’t. That’s probably why they seem more intelligent to me than most of the wildlife that inhabits our yard and the woods beyond it. Of course, the fact that my daughter feeds the chipmunks is probably what motivates them to come inside. They imagine our house as a giant storage facility for peanuts and sunflower seeds — chipmunk heaven. Most of them have probably never seen a cat before coming inside, since all our cats are indoor cats. The feral cat population has thinned out dramatically since mama fox and her cubs moved into the neighborhood.

        As for all the little animals that we catch and release, I expect the majority of them end up as supper for foxes, owls, hawks, etc. I’m not under any sentimental illusion that I’m saving their little lives. It’s just that I hate finding small bodies/body parts in my house. The cats will kill something, eat part of it — or not, depending on how hungry they are — and leave the remains in some completely inappropriate place where they’re likely to be stepped or sat on by some unsuspecting human. I also worry about the cats getting intestinal worms or other parasites if they eat wild animals.

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        • chrissythehyphenated

          Ewww on the body parts and intestinal infestations! I admire your reasoning on all counts. Giggling over chippies discussing where they can get tinfoil to make a hat for their buddy making the Totally Absurd Claim that there are MONSTERS in the Great Haven of Endless Sunflower Seeds. Everybody KNOWS that there are Hungry Foxes out here and that the Goddess with the Hands Filled with Goodness and Plenty comes from in there!

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          • Yep, that about sums it up. 😉

            My husband runs a welfare state for birds while my daughter runs a welfare state for chippies. But as the proprietor of what amounts to a home for wayward cats, who am I to complain?

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  2. chrissythehyphenated

    ROFLLL thanks for the funny pic additions! I had a gf I rarely see visit Sunday and she told me how much she enjoys when I send her a funny picture, that it would be great to start each day with one good laugh. She lives alone (same illness as me, we met at support group) so I decided to try and do that, send her one funny a day. I’m good for about a week with just these cat ones! 🙂

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  3. chrissythehyphenated

    Long ago when I had cats, we had a mouse get in and Gabriel had so much fun playing with his new toy! It died on him and he was so sad. He kept pushing at it with his paw, then looking up at me with this pathetic “Fix my toy, Mom!” expression. LOL

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  4. GP

    As a fellow cat lover, I always enjoy these cat caper stories from the garden.
    But sometimes, they cause catastrophes.
    I recently had a couple of robins build a nest in my hemlock. Even though it was very inconvenient being dive bombed and squawked at whenever I walked out the back door, it was fun to see the three robin blue eggs and then the young hatchlings. Yesterday, Mama robin was in the nest all day. I did not know she sat there after her little birdies hatched, but it was curious. Maybe she smelled a rat?
    Today I went out, thinking I might get to see some flying lessons or something and it was very quiet as I approached the tree. The birds were gone, and the nest was on the ground! So I am assuming one of the roaming cats around here had fun last night. Since I keep my cats inside, just for this reason, it bothers me when others let cats roam and they attack the birds nests.
    I realize that these Robins will not be candidates for bird MENSA because they built their nest only 3 feet off the ground, but still, it saddened me that they got done in by those smarty cats.
    There is a moral to the story in there somewhere.

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    • There sure is — it’s keep your cats indoors. Indoors they are safe from becoming road kill, safe from fleas and lice and ticks and worms and burrs in the fur, safe from becoming supper for foxes and coyotes, and safe from being picked up by animal control. I had to pay a hefty fine years ago to bail out a cat I used to let go outdoors, because he trespassed on someone’s property and they had animal control arrest him and lock him up in kitty prison. It was embarrassing and expensive.

      Getting back to the birds… My husband went out a few days ago to prune back some shrubs in front of our house that have gotten way too big, but he didn’t get very far before he heard a catbird scolding him angrily. He looked and saw that the catbirds had a nest full of eggs in the bush he was working on. So he put away his tools and will wait until the baby birds are out of the nest.

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      • GP

        I hope you don’t have any cat’s in the area. Or do catbirds meow to throw them off course? I don’t think I ever saw or heard one.

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        • There used to be some feral cats in the area, but they either moved out of the neighborhood or the foxes got them. I hope the baby birds will be okay; I think they’re up high enough to be out of reach of the foxes.

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