Another thank you

Some of the loverly behind-the-scenes folks here in the PoliNation garden chipped in to get me a “thank you for blogging” present, some beautiful fabric that I actually tolerate to make myself a much-needed dress. I have a hard time sewing for myself, so I made “scrap” dresses to get the pattern worked out. I ended up with some much needed nighties from the not-quite-right efforts LOL and a couple not-too-bad every-day dresses. Finally, I had the courage to cut into the beautiful fabric and I made this!

Corporal K was able to fly through town recently, on the way to and from a doctor’s appointment. Actually, we are an hour beyond the doctor, but they’re too poor to afford gas to come for Thanksgiving or Christmas this year, so she got up at the crack and drove straight through to our house, we had a speed date style visit … talk as fast and possible, watching the clock, then shoo her out the door so she made it to the doctor on time.

The reason I mention this is that I finished my Beautiful Dress JUST in time for her arrival and the first thing she said on clapping eyes on me was, “Ohhh, you look so pretty in that!!!” 🙂

10 Comments

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10 responses to “Another thank you

  1. Ting

    Corporal K is right – you do look pretty in that! I am in awe of your talents.

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  2. I should point out that the original idea for this came from our friend Integrity1st. She instigated it, the rest of us just contributed. 🙂

    So glad you finally got your new dress, Chrissy! I love it!

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  3. That really is a lovely dress. Well done.

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  4. Yes, the dress and you look lovely, AND I NEVER REMEMBERED TO MAIL MY CONTRIBUTION!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Whomever I should send it to, PLEASE email me the details and address! GADS.

    Chrissy, I thought you sewed a lot, no?

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    • What A Hoot

      Well, what a treat to see my favorite gravatar here today! Sure do miss you hanging around, I1.

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    • chrissythehyphenated

      I sew a lot for other people and quilting. Me, not so much. Between my allergies and the difficulties of fitting myself (way easier to pin and measure on someone else!) and my poor body image … successfully make a dress that is flattering and perfectly comfortable has been a real triumph for me! 🙂

      Besides you guys’ encouragement, I also had Mama Buzz, who helped me get over the “I can’t do this!” problem and break the process into little baby steps I could handle. If the only thing I can handle on a bad day is to just lay a piece of fabric on the ironing board so it’s ready to iron next time I’m functional, well that’s a little bit of progress and it adds up.

      I had a local friend, Karen, who made a dress for me that fit. She’s also sick, so it took her 3 YEARS to finish LOL, but having it proved to me it could be done and I could take measurements off it to get me started.

      And I had my Dearest who finally solved my years long problem with irons that made me sick. He canvassed his friends’ wives for someone who had a good steam iron that was new enough to work well and still be in stock somewhere but old enough and used enough it no longer smelled. Then he bought her a new one and I got the old one.

      It’s hard enough being weak and in pain and shut up in a house mostly alone 24/7. Feeling dumpy and ugly and raggedy just makes it a lot worse. This project has not just been one dress. It has been a new wardrobe and hope and prettiness. I cannot express my gratitude.

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  5. What A Hoot

    Oooh, La La, you look stunning, Chrissy

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  6. Oh HI! Hoot. Miss you too! OXOXO

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  7. GP

    I am always amazed when people can make clothes. I never could get the hang of it. You look great!
    If you ever want any health coaching, let me know. I would be happy to help. I never thought I could feel this great, 5 years ago. Poor health is reversible.

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    • chrissythehyphenated

      What’s wrong with me started before I was born and did a LOT of damage before I was old enough to start trusting my own instincts and look for answers outside western medicine.

      If I hadn’t gone rogue 30 years ago, I wouldn’t have lived long enough to raise my kids, much less enjoy seeing them married and producing grandkids for me.

      My tombstone would’ve been inscribed, “Dammit, I TOLD you I was sick!”

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