Periwinkle in bloom

In west central Wisconsin, we usually don’t start planting earlier than Memorial Day weekend, which is when the danger of frost is past. This is fine with me, as I’ve been too busy to do anything with my gardens yet this year — I hope to get to them sometime next week. Still, as you can see, the periwinkle I planted a few years ago is blooming enthusiastically. I just love flowering plants that thrive on neglect!

9 Comments

Filed under How Does Your Garden Grow?

9 responses to “Periwinkle in bloom

  1. Ting

    So beautiful! There must be a huge climate difference, because our periwinkle bloomed about 2 months ago! I love the rock retaining wall, too. I guess the peonies, which are done here, will be in all of their glory soon.

    Like

    • Yes, we northerners are way behind you southern folks. ๐Ÿ™‚ My iris just started blooming too — will try to get some pictures and post them.

      Like

      • chrissythehyphenated

        Bob, it sounds like we’re more in line with your climate. I saw an iris today. Your rocks and periwinkle look like one of my gardens! We have so much in common :).

        My mom loved the same things, but she called that plant myrtle, which always reminded me more of Dr. Seuss than a pretty creeping perennial, so when I learned it was called Vinca minor, I used that.

        I don’t know that I ever realized it was also called periwinkle, but that sure does make it easier to remember what shade periwinkle blue is doesn’t it?! ๐Ÿ™‚

        Like

        • I have heard it called “creeping myrtle,” but that makes me think of Moaning Myrtle in Harry Potter. Vinca minor is the correct botanical name, but periwinkle is the popular colloquial name for it in this part of the country. It’s the type of plant that is perfect for lackadaisical gardeners like me — it requires almost no care at all, can take sun or shade, wet or dry, hot or cold, and it comes back every year better than ever. Oh, and the deer leave it alone. As someone whose back yard is constantly infested with deer, this is an important consideration. ๐Ÿ™‚

          Like

          • chrissythehyphenated

            We are so on the same page … I like volunteers too. LOL We have a beautiful stand of honeysuckle. I saw it on a list of “nasty, invasive, dig it up!”, but shoot … it cost us nothing, is pretty year round, requires zero maintenance, is of no interest to the deer, and the birds love it for nesting and food. Our little ones LOVED to crawl in and play jungle. We mow around it to keep it from taking over and occasionally top off something that gets taller than I like.

            Like

  2. GP

    I love periwinkle too. I have been trying to get it to overtake an area in my front yard that is full of daffodils as well. So far, the weeds are winning!
    I got my tomatoes in last week and am hoping this heat gets them off to a happy start. I also had a carpenter build a huge table that I am so excited about. I will have a grape arbor growing over it. Finally, I am getting my Italian piazza!
    I heard a couple of great lectures by an organic gardener recently. He said to put this fertilizer on your plants every couple of weeks and it will help to combat bugs and disease. Plants are just like people. If they are healthy, they can fend off attacks.
    2 oz. ammonia
    2 oz. apple cider vinegar
    1 oz molasses
    1 gal water
    I am hoping this stuff works because my garden always looks so bad by Sept.

    Like

  3. We’ve seen a few tulips, and an iris here and there, but since we’re under a winter storm watch this weekend, things like flowers and baby plants are on the endangered species’ list. Miserable weather, I SUPPORT GLOBAL WARMING!!!

    Like